Condolences on the passing of Beverly Cohen sister of Leslie Cohen.

Newsletter

Make The Connection 28 July 2022

 

30 July 2022 / 02 Av 5782

Candle Lighting

5.22pm         

Friday Mincha

5.20pm

Kabbalat Shabbat

6.00pm

Parshat

Matot- Masei

Mincha Shabbos Day

5.00pm

Havdalah

6.13pm

Weekday Mincha

5.30pm

  
THE UNIVERSAL BELIEFS COMMON TO MANKIND

  1. We All Need Meaning. Did you ever ask yourself, “What is it all about?” “What is the point of it all?” Life is more than contentment. No one aspires to emulate a cow contented to graze and lie in the sun.
  2. We Are Not Fulfilling Our Potential. No matter what we accomplish, we feel we could do more. We feel that we have a greater potential than doing just the mundane.
  3. We All Want To Be Great. Nobody wants to be mediocre. We want to be special.
  4. We Turn To God For Help. If you turn to God in a pinch, then don’t wait for the pinch. Ask yourself, “How do I develop a relationship with the Almighty?” and “What does God want me to do with my life to reach my potential?”
  5. We Want To Be Good. People are willing to die to be good. If there is something you would be willing to die for, then it is worth living for it. Figure out what you should be living for.
  6. We Feel Responsible For the World. If you ask someone, “What are you doing to stop the genocide in Africa?” he’ll answer, “What can I do about it?” He won’t say, “It’s not my problem.” Everyone knows that it’s our problem. Everyone knows that we are responsible for the world and others … we just don’t know what to do or are overwhelmed by the responsibility.

QUESTIONS TO HELP YOU GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR LIFE GOALS: 

  1. You dreamed at 20 what you would like to do or be. Are you living that dream?
  2. What would you want said at your eulogy?
  3. Who is your hero? Why?
  4. When do you feel most meaningful?
  5. If you could make a difference, what would you do?

10 JEWISH QUOTES ABOUT KINDNESS by Dr Yvette Alt Miller

Now is a prime time to increase our acts of kindness.
Kindness is paramount in Jewish thought. When the Romans destroyed the Second Temple in Jerusalem nearly 2,000 years ago, the Talmud pinpoints the cause: Jewish infighting and sinat chinam, baseless hatred of one another.
Displaying true love and kindness to one another increases our merit to once again have the Temple in Jerusalem. The Nine Days preceding the fast of Tisha B’Av, which commemorates the destruction of both the First and Second Temples, is a prime time to start changing our behavior and adopting a kinder way of relating to others.

Here are 10 Jewish quotes

Hillel says: Be among the disciples of Aaron, loving peace and pursuing peace, loving people and bringing them closer to the Torah. (Pirkei Avot 1:12)
Aaron, Moses’ brother, was famous for his love of others and the way he helped people mend relationships and end arguments. Jewish tradition teaches that when Aaron saw friends or spouses divided by conflict, he’d speak with them soothingly, assuring each party that the other sincerely regretted their argument and desired peace. This wasn’t a falsehood because in our deepest core each one of us longs for peace with others.

Rabbi Shimon ben Elazar says: A person should always be careful in the way he formulates his responses. (Talmud Megillah 25b)
It’s easy to speak quickly and say something that might hurt others. A truly wise person considers the effects his or her words might have on others.

Acts of kindness never die. They linger in the memory, giving life to other acts in return. – Jonathan Sacks, in From Optimism to Hope
This wise observation echoes the Jewish realization that mitzvah goreret mitzvah: one good deed begets another.

The Sages taught that a person should always be patient like Hillel. (Talmud Shabbat 30b)
The Jewish sage Hillel was known for his scholarship and his intensely patient nature. Even when peppered with many seemingly distracting questions, Hillel always treated each person who approached him with respect and patience. He’s truly a worthy role model for us today, in our impersonal, impatient age.

Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil. The opposite of love is not hated, it’s indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it’s indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it’s indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it’s indifference. – Elie Wiesel, quoted in US News and World Report, Oct. 27, 1986.
Sometimes unkindness doesn’t manifest itself in hostile words or raised voices. Overlooking or ignoring other people can hurt even more than nasty statements. Try taking the time to say a kind word to others. Even simply saying hello and asking people how they are feeling can brighten their day and lighten their load.

Shimon the Righteous was accustomed to say: The world is based on three things – on the Torah, on the service of God, and upon acts of loving-kindness. (Pirkei Avot 1:2)
Kindness isn’t optional in Judaism: reaching out to others is a key part of working to make the world a better place. Being kind is integral to what it means to be a Jew.

Acts of kindness are greater than charity since they can be done for both the rich and poor… Charity can only be done with one’s money, while acts of loving-kindness can be performed both personally and with one’s money. – Rambam (Hilchos Aivel 14:1)
The Medieval Jewish sage Rambam explained that acts of loving kindness can include visiting the sick, inquiring how other people are doing, helping to facilitate weddings and funerals, and treating everyone with warmth. He even prescribed the way we should say goodbye to guests at the end of a visit, walking them to our door and saying goodbye with warmth. Nobody should feel alone and uncared for.

King Solomon Says: Life and death are in the hands of the tongue. (Proverbs 18:21)
Speaking ill of someone is a serious transgression in Judaism. The Talmud says that speaking slander and gossip metaphorically “kills” three people: the person speaking, the subject of the negative speech, and the listener. (Arachim 15b) Stopping speaking gossip can be difficult, but it’s a key way to become a kinder person.

The Sages taught…One who judges another favourably is himself judged favourably. (
Talmud Shabbat 127b)
Judaism demands that we give other people the benefit of the doubt. In our internet-fuelled age of instant “likes” and “dislikes” it’s important to keep an open mind and remind ourselves that we don’t know the whole story and that other people are grappling with circumstances and challenges we know nothing at all about.

Rabbi Akiva taught: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’ (
Leviticus 19:18). This is the most important rule in the Torah. (Jerusalem Talmud Nedarim 30b)
Without love, it’s impossible to treat others as they deserve. Each person is likened to an entire world in Judaism. Remembering this helps us to see the value in each and every person we come across and can help us remember the key Torah commandment to be kind.  

Date

Dawn

Earliest Time for Tallit & Tefillin

Neitz Hachama/ Sunrise

Latest Time for Shema

Chatzot

Mincha Gedola

Mincha Ketana

Plag Hamincha

Shkiah/ Sunset

29 Jul 2022

5:37:24 AM

5:58:33 AM

6:48:30 AM

9:31:22 AM

12:14:13 PM

12:44:13 PM

3:24:14 PM

4:32:05 PM

5:39:56 PM

30 Jul 2022

5:36:56 AM

5:58:04 AM

6:47:57 AM

9:31:04 AM

12:14:11 PM

12:44:11 PM

3:24:30 PM

4:32:28 PM

5:40:26 PM

31 Jul 2022

5:36:28 AM

5:57:34 AM

6:47:22 AM

9:30:45 AM

12:14:09 PM

12:44:09 PM

3:24:46 PM

4:32:50 PM

5:40:55 PM

1 Aug 2022

5:35:58 AM

5:57:03 AM

6:46:46 AM

9:30:26 AM

12:14:05 PM

12:44:05 PM

3:25:01 PM

4:33:13 PM

5:41:24 PM

2 Aug 2022

5:35:27 AM

5:56:30 AM

6:46:09 AM

9:30:05 AM

12:14:01 PM

12:44:01 PM

3:25:17 PM

4:33:35 PM

5:41:53 PM

3 Aug 2022

5:34:55 AM

5:55:57 AM

6:45:31 AM

9:29:44 AM

12:13:57 PM

12:43:57 PM

3:25:32 PM

4:33:57 PM

5:42:22 PM

4 Aug 2022

5:34:22 AM

5:55:22 AM

6:44:52 AM

9:29:22 AM

12:13:52 PM

12:43:52 PM

3:25:46 PM

4:34:19 PM

5:42:51 PM

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEK:
To desire is human; to control our desires
is the essence of being human!

 

WHAT IS TISHA B’AV & THE THREE WEEKS by Rabbi Shraga Simmons 

The Jewish national period of mourning​

The “Three Weeks” between the 17th of Tammuz and the Tisha B’Av have historically been days of misfortune and calamity for the Jewish people. During this time, both the First and
Second Temples were destroyed, amongst other tragedies.
These days are referred to as the period “within the straits” (bein hametzarim), in accordance with the verse: “All her oppressors have overtaken her within the straits” (Lamentations 1:3).
During this time, various aspects of mourning are observed by the entire nation. We minimize joy and celebration – no weddings are held, we do not listen to music, nor are there haircuts or shaving. The expressions of mourning take on greater intensity as we approach the day of Tisha B’Av.
Since the attribute of Divine judgment (“din”) is acutely felt, we avoid potentially dangerous or risky endeavors.
On Shabbat during the Three Weeks, the Haftorahs are taken from chapters in Isaiah and Jeremiah dealing with the Temple’s destruction and the exile of the Jewish people.
Agonizing over these events is meant to help us conquer those spiritual deficiencies which brought about these tragic events. Through the process of “teshuva” – self-introspection and a commitment to improve – we have the power to transform tragedy into joy. In fact, the Talmud says that after the future redemption of Israel and the rebuilding of the Temple, these days will be re-dedicated as days of rejoicing and festivity.
The story is told of Napoleon walking through the streets of Paris one Tisha B’Av. As his passed a synagogue he heard the sounds of mourning and crying. “What’s this all about?” Napoleon asked. An aide explained that the Jews were in mourning the loss of their Temple. “When did this happen?” Napoleon asked. The aide replied, “About 1700 years ago.” Napoleon said, “Certainly a people which has mourned the loss of their Temple for so long, will merit to see it rebuilt!”

SEVENTEENTH OF TAMMUZ

The beginning of a 3-week period of mourning is the 17th of Tammuz, a fast day commemorating the fall of Jerusalem, prior to the destruction of the Holy Temple.
On the 17th of Tammuz, no eating or drinking is permitted from the break of dawn until dusk. (Should the day coincide with Shabbat, the fast is delayed until Sunday.)
Five great catastrophes occurred in Jewish history on the 17th of Tammuz:

  1. Moses broke the tablets at Mount Sinai – in response to the sin of the Golden Calf
  2. The daily offerings in the First Temple were suspended during the siege of Jerusalem, after the Kohanim could no longer obtain animals. 
  3. Jerusalem’s walls were breached, prior to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE. 
  4. Prior to the Great Revolt, the Roman general Apostamos burned a Torah scroll – setting a precedent for the horrifying burning of Jewish books throughout the centuries. 
  5. An idolatrous image was placed in the Sanctuary of the Holy Temple – a brazen act of blasphemy and desecration.

THE NINE DAYS
The period commencing with Rosh Chodesh Av is called the “Nine Days.” During this time, a stricter level of mourning is observed, in accordance with the Talmudic dictum (Ta’anit 26): “When the month of Av begins, we reduce our joy.”
During this time the additional “signs of mourning” include abstaining from meat and wine (except on Shabbat) and from doing laundry or wearing freshly laundered clothes (except on Shabbat). We also do not bathe for pleasure, though it is permitted to bathe in cool water in order to remove dirt or perspiration. For more details, see “The Three Weeks.”

TISHA B’AV – NINTH OF AV
The intensity of mourning reaches a peak on Tisha B’Av, five national calamities occurred:

  1. During the time of Moses, Jews in the desert accepted the slanderous report of the 12 Spies, and the decree was issued forbidding them from entering the Land of Israel. (1312 BCE) 
  2. The First Temple was destroyed by the Babylonians and Nebuchadnezzar. (586 BCE) 
  3. The Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans. (70 CE) 
  4. The Bar Kochba revolt was crushed by Roman Emperor Hadrian. (135 CE)
  5. The Temple Mount was plowed under, and Jerusalem was rebuilt as a pagan city.

Other grave misfortunes throughout Jewish history coincided with the Ninth of Av, including the expulsion from Spain in 1492, the outbreak of World War One in 1914, and the mass deportation of Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto in 1942.
During the late afternoon prior to Tisha B’Av, it is customary to eat Seudah Hamaf-seket – a meal consisting only of bread, water and a hard-boiled egg. The food is dipped in ashes, symbolic of mourning, and eaten while seated on the ground. (The rules are somewhat different when Tisha B’Av falls on Shabbat or Sunday.)
Sundown marks the commencement of Tisha B’Av, where no eating or drinking is permitted until nightfall the following evening. It is also forbidden to bathe or wash, wear leather shoes, or engage in marital relations. We also do not learn Torah, except for texts relevant to Tisha B’Av and mourning – e.g. the book of Lamentations and Job, and certain sections of the Talmud (including the story of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza).
The Book of Eicha (Lamentations), Jeremiah’s poetic lament over the destruction of Jerusalem and the First Temple, is read in the synagogue as part of the evening service. Special “Kinot” (elegies) are also recited, both at night and during the day.
Other mourning practices include sitting on a low chair (after midday, a regular chair permitted; see “Laws of Shoes and Chairs”). We also minimize business and leisure activities.
Following Tisha B’Av, all normal activities may be resumed, except for the following which are delayed until midday of the 10th of Av, because the burning of the Temple continued through the 10th of Av: haircuts, washing clothes, bathing, listening to music, and eating meat and wine. 

CONDOLENCES

Condolences to Doreen Katzen on the loss of her husband, condolences to Roslyn Sugarman, Gary Katzen, Wendy Genn, and Deon Katzen on the loss of their father and condolences to Lynne Brittan on the loss of her brother

Make The Connection 30 June 2022

 

02 July 2022 / 03 Tammuz 5782
Candle Lighting 5.09pm
Friday Mincha 5.15pm
Kabbalat Shabbat 6.00pm
Parshat Korach

Mincha Shabbos Day 4.30pm
Havdalah 6.02pm
Weekday Mincha 5.15pm

 

QUOTE FOR THE WEEK:
Kindness is a language the deaf can hear
and the blind can see.

PARASHAT KORACH – AFTERMATH OF SIN – HOW TO RELATE TO SINNERS by Rav Doron Podlashuk

Why would G-d want the vessels used in a rebellion against Him, to be placed in his Holy Mishkan? We are all familiar with the famous rebellion of Korach and his congregation of 250 people against Moshe and Aharon, and by extension – against G-d Himself. What is less well known is at the end of this tragic episode, after 250 men brought pans filled with incense, and were consumed by fire – Hashem tells Moshe to gather the pans and use them as a covering for the altar.

Why would Hashem want these pans, which symbolize rebellion against the Kohanim and Hashem – in his holy Mikdash? The Torah alludes to the answer in the actual verse:
“[Remove] the fire pans of those who have sinned at the cost of their lives, and make them into hammered sheets as plating for the altar—for they were offered in front of Hashem, and they have become holy—and they shall be a sign for the people of Israel.
But what is the purpose of the “sign”?

Rashi explains that the sign here is a constant reminder to the people of Israel, not to rebel against Hashem. This is reinforced by the words of the verse that follows:
“It was to be a reminder to Bnei Yisrael, that no foreign person—i.e one not of Aaron’s offspring —should offer incense before Hashem, and not be like Korach and his congregation, as Hashem spoke to Moshe.”
However, the Netziv in his commentary Emek Davar4 offers a different and quite novel interpretation. The Netziv points out that the pans that previously only had a low level of holiness (Kedusha Kala), were now invested with high level of holiness (Kedusha Chamura);
as they now became part of the actual Mishkan5. If the entire purpose of using the pans was just to remind us not to sin, it seems strange that Hashem would actually elevate the status of these vessels that were used for sin.

Furthermore, the Netziv points out that if the “sign” referred to in verse 3 is only to remind us not to sin, why did the Torah wait until verse 5 to repeat this “as a remembrance”. It should have all been combined in one verse?

The Netziv explains that the pans on the altar actually had a dual purpose. Over and above them acting as a reminder for the people of Israel not to sin, Hashem wanted to teach us another lesson. The 250 people were not like Korach. They were actually “the righteous people of the generation”. They erred in their hashkafa, thinking that this is really what Hashem wanted. Although they were wrong, after they were punished for their sin, there is no need to erase all the good that they did and intended.

The Netziv stresses that there is a difference between people who really want to do good but err in their understanding of what Hashem wants; as opposed to those who despise and trample on anything to do with Hashem.

Sometimes we are too quick to vilify those who sin or act in an inappropriate way, or in today’s woke language – cancel people. But the Torah is giving us a critical lesson. Yes, it is important, to remind ourselves not to follow in the footsteps of evil people such as Korach. Yet it is also important to realize that sometimes people err and sin, but their heart is in the right place, and it is incumbent upon us to try and differentiate. For, if G-d Himself could find a place in His holy temple for the pans of such people, it behoves us to see if we can find a way to reconcile and see the good that they did actually do in their lifetime.

Shabbat Shalom Umevorach – Rav Doron Podlashuk
The Selwyn and Ros Smith & Family
MANHIGUT TORANIT PROGRAM

TAKE NOTE: 

​MAZELTOV TO!

Engagement
Mazeltov to Ivan and Brenda Segal on Avrahams engamenent to Tamar Wilks in Israel

Wedding
Mazeltov to Rabbi David and Rebbetzin Renee Shaw on Raphaels forthcoming wedding to Ayala daughter of Warren and Aliza Freeman

Shul Services

Shabbos morning, Shul commences at 8.30am

Coffee & Shmooze with Rabbi Abramson
Calling all Nursery School and Primary School Parents, every Tuesday from 8.15am after drop off.

Pop in for a quick coffee, friendship and inspiration to begin your day!!!

Our Sandton Jolly Seniors Club
Wednesday morning at 10am in the Games Room. Join us for a small chat by Carol Zimmerman, a movie and a scrumptious tea.

Sefer Mishlei and Tehillim
We meet daily on Zoom at 4.30pm Sunday to Thursday to have a short shiur in The Book of Proverbs and Tehillim for those who are in need of a Refuah Shelaima.  Please join Rabbi Shaw on Zoom.  The link is:

https://us04web.zoom.us/j/74023808649?pwd=J3mjamguN_vFJuQz41D2YFRmPBmHK-.1
 Meeting ID: 740 2380 8649
Passcode: KpJ0Fg

Sandton Shul Mikvah
Sandton Shul Mikvah is open every night by appointment only. Contact Lynda Romain, 24 hours in advance on 083 2668149 to make an appointment. All Covid protocols are adhered to.

Got a Halachic Question?
Need a quick answer – Sms or WhatsApp Rabbi Shaw on 0726966535 or E-mail davidshaw@sandtonshul.co.za
The Kosher desk is open from 9am – 5pm on weekdays for all Kashrut related questions.  Just WhatsApp them on 063 6939417.

Please let us know if you know of PG good news and GF any sad news or people who are not well.

Refuah Shelaima to any of our Kehilla who are ill.

Library Books

Our Library is being refreshed, so if you would like to donate a book/s or children’s books in honour of a Yahrzeit/Birthday/Anniversary/or for anything, to our library please contact Rabbi David Shaw.

If you have borrowed books from the Library, please return them as they are all over due

Security
We encourage all members, especially women and children, to walk to and from shul in groups of at least two or more.

If you see anything or anyone suspicious in or around the shul property then please report it immediately to the CSO on 086 18 000 18.

If you live in a CAP area and see anything or anyone suspicious in your area then please report it immediately to CAP on 086 122 7227.

Edited by Rabbi David Shaw / Published by Sandton Shul
Telephone Number 0118834210
E-Mail sandtonshul@sandtonshul.co.za

Make The Connection 24 June 2022

 

25 June 2022 / 26 Sivan 5782

Candle Lighting

5.07pm         

Friday Mincha

5.15pm

Kabbalat Shabbat

6.00pm

Parshat

Shelach

Shabbos Mevarachim

 

Mincha Shabbos Day

04.45pm

Havdalah

5.59pm

Weekday Mincha

5.15pm

 

SHABBAT SHALOM
On a Friday night we cover the Holy Challot while making kiddush so as to hide the Shabbos Kiddush wine from the Shabbos breads. You see normally we precede the blessing on wine with the Hamotzi on the bread. Since we cannot eat the Challah on Shabbat without making Kiddush first, we don’t want the Challot to be embarrassed as it were, so we cover them. Is bread able to see? Can bread really feel embarrassed? There is a deep message in this that teaches us that if indeed we have to display sensitivity even to inanimate objects, how much more do we have to be sensitive to people who can see and who can feel embarrassed. That is being menshy!!

I saw a similar theme in this week’s Parasha. Rashi asks how come the section dealing with Miriam speaking negatively about Moshe Rabbeinu, her brother, is juxtaposed with the portion of the spies? He answers and says that the spies should have learned the deleterious effects of speaking bad but unfortunately, they did not. How can we point fingers at the spies? After all, when all is said and done, Miriam spoke Lashon Harah about Moshe, the Gadol Hador, father of all the prophets who preceded and who followed him. Moshe was the greatest Jew who ever lived. He learned for 40 days and nights with G d Himself. He received the Torah from G d’s mouth. Of course, being disparaging to him would be a big mistake. The spies however were speaking about sticks and stones. About earth and dust? How can that be compared to speaking about Moshe? We can say again, just like with our inanimate challah, if one needs to be careful with the feelings of those who cannot see or feel how much more we have to be careful with those who can!

What was the bottom line of Miriam’s mistake? Not what she said but rather to whom she said it. She should have spoken directly to Moshe himself. The spies too should have reported back to Moshe himself and not to the public.

Let us learn from both Miriam and the spies to be careful what we say and to whom we say it and also from Moshe who was so forgiving.

Just Stay Safe. Just stay warm!

Rabbi David Shaw

MY FATHER WAS POW AT STALAG LUFT 1 AND WAS AWARDED THE PURPLE HEART WITH OAK LEAF CLUSTER FOR HIS INCREDIBLE BRAVERY

In early 1943, during World War II, my father, Henry Levine, enlisted in the US Army Air Force and trained to become a navigator, flying B-17 bombers over Nazi Germany. He risked his life fighting for his country, not once but twice.

At 30,000 feet the temperature inside the plane was 60 below zero. The crew wore heated electric suits. At that high an altitude, you also needed oxygen to breathe. The plane was always under constant attack from German fighter planes and targeted with anti-aircraft shelling called flak. The flak was so intense that it turned the daylight into night. The constant attacks caused the heated suits to malfunction and the oxygen to stop working.

This caused my father to get severe frostbite and also anoxia, lack of oxygen. He was hospitalized, and then cleared a few days later to fly again, ready for his next mission. This time the plane caught fire and exploded, and the crew had to bail out. It was February of 1944. My father reached the ground and his parachute dragged him; the impact broke his leg. In June of 1944 my father spent Father’s Day in Stalag Luft I, a Prisoner of War Camp deep in the heart of Nazi Germany. His father and mother received one of those telegrams: “We regret to inform you that your son, 2nd Lt. Henry S. Levine, has been reported as missing in action over Nazi Germany.”

I try to imagine how this news affected my grandparents and how, on Father’s Day, it must have been compounded by them not knowing whether their only child was dead or alive.
My father was an observant Jew, and the prisoner camp was surrounded by concentration camps and death camps, such as Ravensbrück and Sachsenhausen. Stalag Luft I was on the railroad line that led to Auschwitz, the most notorious death camp.

My father risked his life the second time by organizing secret prayer services for the other Jewish prisoners of war. For 15 months he organized and conducted these clandestine services. Nothing like this was happening anywhere else in Nazi Germany.

He conducted the services from memory. He also made a wooden Star of David to be used during the services. When the word was that were guards approaching, they took apart the Star of David and turned it into two harmless looking triangles.

My father was fluent in many languages: Yiddish, conversational Hebrew, Hebrew, Russian, Ukrainian, German, Latin, French, and Polish. His language skills came in handy in the prison camp. The Russian Red Army liberated the camp in 1945. It was my father’s command of Yiddish that connected to the liberators. Some of them turned out to be Jews completely fluent in the Yiddish language and culture.

When my father was liberated, he was awarded a Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, which is like receiving two Purple Hearts, and he was promoted to the rank of 1st Lieutenant. I still have the Purple Heart, along with the other medals and Citations for Conspicuous Service to his Country that he received.

When he left the prison camp, he took the Star of David and brought it back to Syracuse. My brothers and I still have the wooden star. My brother Ron takes it with him when he does presentations about our dad across the country.

My two brothers and I grew up knowing that our dad was somebody special. We tried to emulate him as best we could. Through my father we developed the importance of education, a strong belief in G-d and a strong connection to Judaism.

 

TAKE NOTE: 

​L’hitraot 
We wish Rabbi Sruli and Sara Kaufman and family Hatzlacha Rabba as they return to Israel

We wish Ari and Danit Davidowitz and family Hatzlacha Rabba as they will be making Aliyah in a few weeks.

Shul Services

Shabbos morning, Shul commences at 8.30am

Rosh Chodesh Tammuz is on Wednesday and Thursday.  Molad is Wednesday, 29 June at 06:48 and 3 Chalakim

Esti Hamilton
Topic: The Path to Authenticity on Monday evening 27 June 2022

Time: 7.45pm
Venue: Ryan and Sam Friedman, 6 Sandown Scapes 11 David Road, Sandown

Men and Women Welcome

Coffee & Shmooze with Rabbi Abramson
Calling all Nursery School and Primary School Parents, every Tuesday from 8.15am after drop off.

Pop in for a quick coffee, friendship and inspiration to begin your day!!!

Our Sandton Jolly Seniors Club
Wednesday morning at 10am in the Games Room. Join us for a small chat by Carol Zimmerman, a movie and a scrumptious tea.

Sefer Mishlei and Tehillim
We meet daily on Zoom at 4.30pm Sunday to Thursday to have a short shiur in The Book of Proverbs and Tehillim for those who are in need of a Refuah Shelaima.  Please join Rabbi Shaw on Zoom.  The link is:

https://us04web.zoom.us/j/74023808649?pwd=J3mjamguN_vFJuQz41D2YFRmPBmHK-.1
 Meeting ID: 740 2380 8649
Passcode: KpJ0Fg

Sandton Shul Mikvah
Sandton Shul Mikvah is open every night by appointment only. Contact Lynda Romain, 24 hours in advance on 083 2668149 to make an appointment. All Covid protocols are adhered to.

Got a Halachic Question?
Need a quick answer – Sms or WhatsApp Rabbi Shaw on 0726966535 or E-mail davidshaw@sandtonshul.co.za
The Kosher desk is open from 9am – 5pm on weekdays for all Kashrut related questions.  Just WhatsApp them on 063 6939417.

Please let us know if you know of PG good news and GF any sad news or people who are not well.

Refuah Shelaima to any of our Kehilla who are ill.

Library Books

Our Library is being refreshed, so if you would like to donate a book/s or children’s books in honour of a Yahrzeit/Birthday/Anniversary/or for anything, to our library please contact Rabbi David Shaw.

If you have borrowed books from the Library, please return them as they are all over due

Security
We encourage all members, especially women and children, to walk to and from shul in groups of at least two or more.

If you see anything or anyone suspicious in or around the shul property then please report it immediately to the CSO on 086 18 000 18.

If you live in a CAP area and see anything or anyone suspicious in your area then please report it immediately to CAP on 086 122 7227.

Edited by Rabbi David Shaw / Published by Sandton Shul
Telephone Number 0118834210
E-Mail sandtonshul@sandtonshul.co.za

Make The Connection 5 May 2022

 

RABBI MORDECHAI KAMENENTZKY ON THIS WEEK’S PARSHA – HONORABLE MENTSHEN

This week the Torah tells us about loving every Jew. It adds a special verse exhorting us to be especially sensitive to a special type of Jew ­ the convert. “When a proselyte dwells among you in your land, do not taunt him. The proselyte who dwells with you shall be like a native among you, and you shall love him like yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt — I am Hashem, your G-d” (Leviticus 19:33-34)

A person who converts has the status of a Jew. He is a full-fledged member of the community and every social, moral and ethical tenet applies to him. Though he may be exempt from particular laws concerning “kahal” (which would have implications in marital law), he is otherwise as equal as any Jew. And that’s why this verse troubles me. After all, if the convert is a Jew, why do we need a special command telling us not to inflict any discomfort upon him? Hadn’t the Torah told us in verse 18, “Love your neighbor as yourself?” Why implore born-Jews to be nice to the newcomers through a series of commands that seem to use a moral approach: “You were once a stranger, so you know how it feels?” A convert is a Jew. And a Jew is a Jew is a Jew! All rules apply!

When my grandfather Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetzky, of blessed memory, was dean of Mesivta Torah Voda’ath back in the 1950s, he developed a professional relationship with a psychotherapist who worked with some of the students. The doctor would often call Rabbi Kamenetzky to discuss his treatment of some of the students under his care. They also would have discussions on psychology and education. The doctor was a student of the famed psychotherapist, Dr. Sigmund Freud, and despite Freud’s attitude toward religion, this particular doctor was always respectful and never attributed any of the students’ problems to observance or religious commitment.

Years later, when Rav Yaakov was informed that the doctor had passed away, he felt it incumbent to attend his funeral. He assumed it would not be the type of service he was used to, and even understood that he, a frocked and bearded sage, would appear out of place among a medical community of his distinguished colleagues, assimilated German and Austrian psychotherapists and mental health professionals. However, Rav Yaakov’s gratitude overruled his hesitation.

When entering the Riverside Chapel, Rav Yaakov was shocked to see that a distinguished Rav, a friend of his, was performing the funeral and that scores of Torah observant Jews were participating. After the service which was done in total compliance with halacha, Rav Yaakov approached his friend who had officiated.

How do you know the doctor? What connection do you have with him? “What do you mean,” answered the Rav. “Of course, I knew him. The doctor davened in my shul three times a day!”

My grandfather had never discussed religion with the man, he just respected him for his professionalism and abilities.

The Torah tells us that even though there is a universal command to love every Jew as yourself, an additional concept applies specifically to a convert. We must be kind to him as part of the overall moral obligation of a nation that also endured the trauma of being strangers. In addition to loving Jews as their inherent birth right, it is also imperative to display love to them when our moral obligation demands it. The Torah is teaching us not only to act with affection as born Jews but as honourable mentshen. 

THE PARSHA QUIZ by Rabbi Jonathan Fox

Questions and answers are based on the simple translation of the Chumash.
KEDOSHIM
Q. Fill in the missing word: “You shall be _____, for I am holy”
A. holy [19:2]
Q. In the command to revere one’s parents, which is stated first: one’s father or one’s mother?
A. One’s mother [19:3]
Q. When one reaps the harvest of one’s land, (a) which part of the field should not be reaped? (b) What other part of the harvest should not be taken?
A.         (a) The corner [19:9]   (b) The gleanings [19:9]
Q. (a) What item of the vineyard should not be gathered? (b) For whom should they be left?
A.         (a) The fallen fruit [19:10]   (b) For the poor and the convert [19:10]
Q. What command precedes the command not to deny falsely?
A. Not to steal [19:11]
Q. Fill in the missing word: ‘You shall not withhold a worker’s wage until ______.’
A. morning [19:13] 
Q. Is it permitted to curse a deaf man?
A. No [19:14]
Q. Complete: ‘and you shall not place a stumbling block ____________________’
A. before the blind [19:14]
Q. Is it permitted to favour the poor in judgment?
A. No [19:15]
Q. What command immediately follows the command not to be a gossipmonger?
A. To not stand idly by when your fellow’s blood is shed [19:16]
Q. What command immediately precedes the command to reprove your fellow?
A. Not to hate your brother in your heart [19:17]
Q. Fill in the missing word: ‘You shall love your fellow as ________’
A. yourself [19:18]
Q. What statement immediately follows the command to love one’s fellow?
A. I am Hashem [19:18]
Q. Put the following commands in the correct order: not to interbreed your animal; for a garment of mixed fibers not to come upon you; not to plant your field with mixed seed
A. Not to interbreed your animal; not to plant your field with mixed seed; for a garment of mixed fibers not to come upon you [19:19]
Q. A man has relations with a slavewoman who has been designated for another man, and who has not been redeemed and has not been freed. They shall not be put to death as she has not been freed. What type of offering must he bring and what animal must it be.
A. A guilt-offering that is a ram [19:21]
Q. (a) May a person eat the fruit from a tree in its third year since planting? (b) What is the status of the fruit of the fourth year?
A.         (a) No [19:23]   (b) Sanctified to laud Hashem [19:24]
Q. Is sorcery permitted?
A. No [19:26]
Q. Fill in the missing words: ‘You shall not round off the edge of your _____ and you shall not destroy the edges of your ______’
A. scalp; beard [19:27]
Q. Is it forbidden to tattoo oneself?
A. Yes [19:28]
Q. What is one obligated to do in front of an old person?
A. One must rise [19:32]
Q. Why must you love a convert like oneself?
A. Because you were aliens in the land of Egypt [19:34]
Q. List the four types of measuring tools in one’s possession that must be accurate.
A. Scales, weights, dry measures and liquid measures [19:36]
Q. What is the human-administered punishment for one who gives his seed over to Molech?
A. Death by stoning [20:2]
Q. In the prohibition to curse one’s parents, which is stated first: one’s father or one’s mother?
A. One’s father [20:9]
Q. True or false: Both and adulterer and an adulteress ate liable to the death penalty.
A. True [20:10]
Q. What is the punishment for a man who has relations with his daughter-in-law?
A. Death [20:12]
Q. What type of death penalty is a man liable to for having relations with his wife’s mother?
A. Burning [20:14]
Q. What is the punishment for a man who has relations with his aunt?
A. He will die childless [20:20]
Q. Complete: ‘and I have separated you from the nations to be _____’
A. Mine [20:26]

CONDOLENCES

Condolences to Thelma Gluch on the loss of her husband and condolences to Shareen, Colin, Desmond, and Laurence on the loss of his father and condolences to Julius and Benny Gluch on the loss of their brother

 

TAKE NOTE: 

 Shul Services

Shabbos morning, Shul commences at 8.30am 

Our Sandton Jolly Seniors Club
Wednesday morning at 10am in the Games Room. Join us for a small chat by Carol Zimmerman, a movie and a scrumptious tea.

Sefer Mishlei and Tehillim
We meet daily on Zoom at 4.30pm Sunday to Thursday to have a short shiur in The Book of Proverbs and Tehillim for those who are in need of a Refuah Shelaima.  Please join Rabbi Shaw on Zoom.  The link is:

https://us04web.zoom.us/j/74023808649?pwd=J3mjamguN_vFJuQz41D2YFRmPBmHK-.1
 Meeting ID: 740 2380 8649
Passcode: KpJ0Fg

Sandton Shul Mikvah
Sandton Shul Mikvah is open every night by appointment only. Contact Lynda Romain, 24 hours in advance on 083 2668149 to make an appointment. All Covid protocols are adhered to.

Got a Halachic Question?
Need a quick answer – Sms or WhatsApp Rabbi Shaw on 0726966535 or E-mail davidshaw@sandtonshul.co.za
The Kosher desk is open from 9am – 5pm on weekdays for all Kashrut related questions.  Just WhatsApp them on 063 6939417.

Please let us know if you know of PG good news and GF any sad news or people who are not well.

Refuah Shelaima to any of our Kehilla who are ill.

Library Books

Our Library is being refreshed, so if you would like to donate a book/s or children’s books in honour of a Yahrzeit/Birthday/Anniversary/or for anything, to our library please contact Rabbi David Shaw.

If you have borrowed books from the Library, please return them as they are all over due

Security
We encourage all members, especially women and children, to walk to and from shul in groups of at least two or more.

If you see anything or anyone suspicious in or around the shul property then please report it immediately to the CSO on 086 18 000 18.

If you live in a CAP area and see anything or anyone suspicious in your area then please report it immediately to CAP on 086 122 7227.

Edited by Rabbi David Shaw / Published by Sandton Shul
Telephone Number 0118834210
E-Mail sandtonshul@sandtonshul.co.za

Make The Connection 8 April 2022

 

PARASHAT METZORA – IT’S ALL ABOUT THE TWEET! by Rav Otniel

As part of the purifying process for a person with tzaraat, the Torah requires that one bring:  “two live, clean birds, a cedar stick, a strip of crimson [wool], and hyssop”. There is a dispute amongst the commentators as to which birds are to be brought.
Rashi explains that that the Torah emphasized that birds are chayot – alive, as opposed to treifot (birds that won’t be able to survive), and clean birds- excludes tamei birds.
The Midrash clarifies that the reason why the leper should bring chirping birds is because there is a tradition passed down amongst the Sages, that the leprosy plague is due to lashon hara. Hashem therefore said – let a voice come and atone for a voice.

The Ramban, on the other hand, studied the meaning of the verse differently. According to the Ramban, not all kosher birds are acceptable to be brought by the metzora. Rather one needs to bring small kosher birds that chirp and twitter. He learns this out from the word “tzippor”. He adds that the best way to fulfill the commandment is by bringing a tzippor dror- a free bird, but this is not critical to perform the mitzvah. The Rambam also writes that the birds have to be a tzippor dror – a free bird.

Although both Rashi and the Ramban agree that it is best that a chirping kosher bird is brought by the metzora, Rashi seems to highlight that it must not be a treifa and any kosher bird would be acceptable. The Ramban on the other hand explains that the main emphasis is to bring small kosher chirping birds.

What is the root of this argument? Rashi understands that the birds of the metzorah come as a type of sacrifice to atone for one’s sin, and hence the laws of sacrifices apply in general.

But the Ramban understood that the purification of the metzorah is not a sacrifice, rather the Torah is teaching us mussar. The Midrash highlights that one should find a bird that is as free, without limits, to teach that although one is free to use his speech, this does not mean that we should use it in a negative way. Perhaps the Torah also highlights how speaking badly can spread so quickly and freely with severe repercussions – as the verse states “Ki of Hashamaym yolich et hakol- the Birds will spread the message”.

Whether the purification process is a type of sacrifice, (which is unique as it is a sin between people, that we generally don’t bring sacrifices for) or a tedious process aimed at making a person reflect on the damage one caused, the Torah is teaching us that our words are not just a twitter. They have powerful repercussions that can hurt or inspire.
May our tweets and words always be on the side of bringing peace and joy to others and not the other way chalila.
Shabbat Shalom Umevorach
Rav Otniel Fendel
The Selwyn and Ros Smith & Family
MANHIGUT TORANIT PROGRAM

 

 

TAKE NOTE: 

MAZELTOV TO!

Wedding
Mazeltov to Saul, son of Mark and Michelle Mazerow grandson of Lily Blou and Cynthia Maserow on his fortcoming wedding to Gabriella, daughter of Susan and the Late Owen Blumeberg.

Mazeltov to Dean son of Derek & Loryn Sevel, grandson of Marion Glasser and Beverley Pokroy on his forthcoming wedding to Danielle daughter of Mike and Leslene Friedman.

Shul Services

Shabbos morning, Shul commences at 8.30am 

Pesach
Kashering facilities on Sunday morning from 10am to 1pm

Our Sandton Jolly Seniors Club
Will resume again after Pesach

Sefer Mishlei and Tehillim
We meet daily on Zoom at 5pm Sunday to Thursday to have a short shiur in The Book of Proverbs and Tehillim for those who are in need of a Refuah Shelaima.  Please join Rabbi Shaw on Zoom.  The link is:

https://us04web.zoom.us/j/74023808649?pwd=J3mjamguN_vFJuQz41D2YFRmPBmHK-.1
 Meeting ID: 740 2380 8649
Passcode: KpJ0Fg

Sandton Shul Mikvah
Sandton Shul Mikvah is open every night by appointment only. Contact Lynda Romain, 24 hours in advance on 083 2668149 to make an appointment. All Covid protocols are adhered to.

Got a Halachic Question?
Need a quick answer – Sms or WhatsApp Rabbi Shaw on 0726966535 or E-mail davidshaw@sandtonshul.co.za
The Kosher desk is open from 9am – 5pm on weekdays for all Kashrut related questions.  Just WhatsApp them on 063 6939417.

Please let us know if you know of PG good news and GF any sad news or people who are not well.

Refuah Shelaima to any of our Kehilla who are ill.

Library Books

Our Library is being refreshed, so if you would like to donate a book/s in honour of a Yahrzeit/Birthday/Anniversary/or for anything, to our library please contact Rabbi David Shaw.

If you have borrowed books from the Library, please return them as they are all over due

Security
We encourage all members, especially women and children, to walk to and from shul in groups of at least two or more.

If you see anything or anyone suspicious in or around the shul property then please report it immediately to the CSO on 086 18 000 18.

If you live in a CAP area and see anything or anyone suspicious in your area then please report it immediately to CAP on 086 122 7227.

Edited by Rabbi David Shaw / Published by Sandton Shul
Telephone Number
0118834210
E-Mail sandtonshul@sandtonshul.co.za

2020 Sandton Shul Batmitzvah Ceremony