Mazeltov to Ze’ev and Yael Gluckman on the birth of a son born in Israel and mazeltov to grandparents Bernard and Debbie Gien.    Mazeltov to Dean and Chanah Marcus on the birth of a son and mazeltov to grandparents Stan and Jennifer Marcus.    Mazeltov to Herbie and Rhona Ullman on the birth of a grandson and mazeltov to parents Ryan and Leanne Lenhoff in Australia.    Mazeltov to Rabbi Sruli and Shira Kaufman on the birth of a son and mazeltov to grandparents Rabbi and Rebbetzin Suchard.    Mazeltov to Caylee daughter Howard and Janice Talpert on the occasion of her engagement to Assaf Sarid in Israel.
Dvar Torah by Rabbi Zelig Pliskin

Dvar Torah by Rabbi Zelig Pliskin

The Torah states: “If a person steals an ox or a sheep and slaughters it or sells it, he must pay five oxen for an ox and four sheep for the sheep” (Exodus 21:37).

Why is the fine for stealing a sheep less than the fine for stealing an ox? What lesson can we learn from this for our lives?

Rashi, the great 13th century commentator, cites the Sages of the Talmud that the reason the thief pays less for a sheep is that he has to carry it on his shoulders to run away faster when stealing it. Running with a sheep on one’s shoulders in public is embarrassing and this embarrassment is a partial punishment in itself.

Rabbi Simcha Zissel of Kelm comments that if even a coarse thief experiences a slight embarrassment which lightens the punishment, then all the more so if one suffers embarrassment or humiliation while doing a good deed, the action is elevated and the reward will be very great!

Our lesson: According to the pain and difficulty of performing a mitzvah is the reward. If others mock or denigrate your efforts to do a mitzvah, then focus not on the temporal pain but the greatness and the eternity of the reward!

2020 Sandton Shul Batmitzvah Ceremony