Mazeltov to David and Cindy Mazor on the birth of a daughter.    Mazeltov to Mervyn and Lynette Miller on the birth of a granddaughter and mazeltov to parents Robin and Craig Schraibman    Condolences on the passing of Shirley Meyers beloved mother of Gigi Wolf     Mazeltov to David and Lilianne Hill on the birth of a grandson    Mazeltov to Shaun and Lisa Mondschein on the birth of a son and to grandparents Denis and Minette Mondschein and Wilfred and Dianne Orleow    Condolences to Brian Banks on the passing of beloved sister Heather Banks

Home » PARSHAT KORACH

PARSHAT KORACH

latest_news_jewish_sandton_shul_image I saw the most phenomenal piece of Torah in the writings of Rabbi Moshe Donnenbaum, a Rav, and Rosh Kehillah in Melbourne. In the 1800th century there was a huge macholoket (dispute) which ripped the Jewish world in two. Even the Vilna Gaon was unable to bring peace to the two camps. This dispute was between the followers of two giants and was clearly lasheim shamayayim (for the sake of heaven). Many of their followers stoked the flames of this dispute.

Many years later, long after the two protagonists, Rabbi Yonason Eibshitz and Rabbi Yaacov Emdin passed away, Rabbi Yonason Eibshitz appeared to one of the great sages of that generation in a dream. The Rabbi reported that both he and Rabbi Yaacov Emdin were enjoying each other’s company in Gan Eden while the stirrers of the dispute were still suffering in Gehenom. How could that be? It is well known that Gehenom lasts for a maximum of twelve months. Rabbi Donnenbaum explained that there are some exceptions to this rule. Regarding Machloket mongers, those who promote and ferment machlocket, their punishment or indeed their cleansing process for such a heinous sin, can extend well beyond the twelve months. So bad is this sin, one should literally ensure never ever to be involved. We see in the Parasha the way heaven dealt with Korach and his cohort of 250 for promoting through there speech and actions enmity within the camp of Israel.

I think it was Ronald Reagan, while president of the USA who said Peace is not absence of conflict; it is the ability to handle conflict by peaceful means.

Shabbat Shalom

Rabbi David Shaw