Condolences to Martin Jankelowitz on the passing of his father, Harold Jankelowitz.    Mazeltov to Louis Defries on the birth of twin grandchildren and mazeltov to parents Mark and Pam Defries.    Mazeltov to Aimee daughter of Janice Milner and granddaughter of Dorothy Milner on the occasion of her engagement to Daniel Verblum from Australia    Mazeltov to Saul Symanowitz, on the occasion of his engagement to Nikki Etkind    Condolences to Douglas Ndlovo on the passing of his nephew, George Sibanda     Mazeltov to Jack and June Edery and Hyman and Helen Burnstein on the birth of a grandaughter and to parents Lance and Tali Burnstein on the birth of a daughter    Mazeltov to Rabbi and Rebbetzin Suchard on the birth of a great grandchild    Mazeltov to Jeffrey and Avril Forman on the birth of a grandson and mazeltov to parents Daniel and Eliesheva on the birth of a son

Home » The Shul Connection » DVAR TORAH

DVAR TORAH

 

DVAR TORAH

by Rabbi Abraham J Twerski

 

The first portion of Bamidbar is generally read before the Shavuot festival, which commemorates the giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai. In as much as there are no coincidences, we may assume that this portion is a prerequisite for receiving the Torah.

In relating the episode at Mt. Sinai, the Torah states: “Israelites camped near the mountain” (Exodus 19:2).

However, the Torah uses the singular vayichan, “he camped” rather than vayachanu, “they camped.” Rashi explains that the singular indicated that all the Israelites were united as one person. It is this unity that made them worthy of receiving the Torah.

There is nothing so dear to G-d as unity among His children. So much so, that the Talmud states that when Jews are united, G-d forgives even their greatest sins (Kallah 8).

The message of Bamidbar is the message of unity: “The Children of Israel shall encamp, each person by his banner” (Numbers 2:2). Each person knew his place and was not envious of others. This is why the Torah reading of Bamidbar precedes Shavuot. Unity is the prerequisite for acceptance of the Torah.

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